Go-around

Air France A340 SXM Go Around

There’s video of an Air France A340 (guessing it’s an A340) performing a go-around at Princess Juliana International Airport (SXM), St. Maarten.

I suspect it’s wasn’t really the result of Hurricane Isaac, despite occurring when the storm was in the area and the video title suggesting. There’s nothing in the video to suggest wind was impacting the yaw or roll of the aircraft. The sea isn’t churning like the winds were really whipping.

As far as I’m aware, SXM doesn’t have ILS like many commercial airports. That makes things slightly more difficult in terms of establishing a glide slope (GS). The runway is 7,546 ft, not that short, however I’d bet the airline wants planes to attempt to touchdown earlier to allow for less reverse thrusters and save fuel in this economy. Especially for a larger plane like the A340 which will be burning a ton of fuel to climb out of that airport and get around those mountains. The go-around was likely the result of a slightly to steep GS. Ironically resulting in more fuel being burnt going around. Not terribly uncommon.

That’s my theory.

Via Business Insider

St. Maarten Airport Fun

A week ago I came back from St. Maarten, an island known for it’s weather and beaches. There are a few ways to tell a good beach from a great one:

  1. Clean beaches.
  2. Evidence that topless tanning is allowed.
  3. Signs like the one to the left warning you of death by heavy metal.

A beach with an active runway for an international airport makes for a good time. So much so I got to this beach a several times. Equipped with a camera phone I took some video’s of the fun. The video’s are slightly grainy since it was taken on a phone, and a bit shaky since the jet blast could be pretty strong at times.

For the record, sand does go through clothing at that speed. It was strong enough that I wasn’t able to watch a takeoff live as I had to turn my head and close my eyes. Only afterward could I watch the video replay.

Noteworthy

Boeing 747 takeoff (can’t even keep the camera up).

Almost being hit by a DHL plane

Side Shot of a landing

There’s about a dozen videos and a few pictures.

Monkey’s On A Plane

Oh boy would “Monkey’s On A Plane” be a blockbuster. Just a blank tape with that title would make millions. Film a real movie, and it’s [pinky in mouth] billions.

Well, apparently enough monkeys travel on commercial airlines every year to warrant their own section in on the TSA website. I’d love to have a monkey sitting near me, rather than a small crying child. Why do I get stuck with kids near me, instead of a chimp?

Excerpt copied below to ensure this gem is never lost:

Monkey Helpers

  • When a monkey is being transported in a carrier, the monkey must be removed from the carrier by the handler prior to screening,
  • The monkey must be controlled by the handler throughout the screening process.
  • The monkey handler should carry the monkey through the WTMD while the monkey remains on a leash.
  • When the handler and monkey go through the WTMD and the WTMD alarms, both the handler and the monkey must undergo additional screening.
  • Since monkeys may likely draw attention, the handler will be escorted to the physical inspection area where a table is available for the monkey to sit on.  Only the handler will touch or interact with the monkey.
  • TSOs have been trained to not touch the monkey during the screening process.
  • TSOs will conduct a visual inspection on the monkey and will coach the handler on how to hold the monkey during the visual inspection.
  • The inspection process may require that the handler take off the monkey’s diaper as part of the visual inspection.

Source: TSA.gov

Hat Tip to JWZ.