Camino 1.5

Camino 1.5 is out. It’s a great product for Mac users. Lets face it, the best browsers are on the Mac right now. Camino, Firefox, Safari, Shiira, and OmniWeb. All provide an excellent user experience. Camino is a great balance between the Gecko rendering engine (which has the benefit of extra market share thanks to it’s cross platform nature and sibling Firefox’s efforts) and a smooth UI. The obvious downside being the lack of extensions.

The end of Internet Explorer 5 for Mac

Microsoft Says:

In June 2003, the Microsoft Macintosh Business Unit announced that Internet Explorer for Mac would undergo no further development, and support would cease in 2005. In accordance with published support lifecycle policies, Microsoft will end support for Internet Explorer for Mac on December 31st, 2005, and will provide no further security or performance updates.

Additionally, as of January 31st, 2006, Internet Explorer for the Mac will no longer be available for download from Mactopia. It is recommended that Macintosh users migrate to more recent web browsing technologies such as Apple’s Safari.

We all knew that was coming, they haven’t updated the thing in ages… I wonder why they didn’t mention Firefox or Camino (which is sometimes unfortunately forgotten with all the Firefox marketing). It seems a lot of Mac users still use IE on the Mac, despite it’s age. Simply because they think it’s the same as IE for windows (when in fact they don’t share any more than the name). Hopefully they will begin to migrate to something more modern. IE5/Mac had some advanced rendering for the time, but by today’s standards, it doesn’t do much.

[Via Slashdot]

Camino Nightlies Rock

My mac mini right now is my primary system as my laptop is down with a bad hard drive (and still on backorder). Typically my PC handles my mail and basic web browsing. So I was still using Camino 0.8.4 until just tonight when I leaped into nightlies. I’m posting just to give a giant thanks to the Camino team for their amazing work on this browser. The only complaint I have right now is the lack of extensions (and that will remain indefinitely due to it’s design). It’s extremely fast (one bounce to launch), looking extremely good, and even fixed some of the ugly stuff I hated about previous versions (like those uber-ugly tabs). The new design is sleek and just perfect.

So once again thanks to everyone who make Camino what it is. If only some of this performance tuning could be brought to Firefox, and especially Thunderbird (which is extremely slow on my mac mini).

Anyway. It’s pure bliss. If you have a Mac, I’d suggest downloading, “installing” (you Mac guys know how great our “Installs” are), and give it a go.

Apple Helping out Mozilla

Very interesting developments lately regarding Apple and Mozilla. At first, it appeared the groups were closer than they appeared. Rumor was that iBrowser (known as Safari now), was going to use then Chimera (now Camino) as it’s basis. Ended up Apple used KHTML, and some claimed it made them “compete”, though most including myself believe any standards compliant engine is good.

Now Pinkerton makes a very interesting find:

Apple has started bundling NSPR and NSS in Panther

From November 3, 2003 @ 10:38 PM

So Apple apparently is providing some sort of Aid for Mozilla technologies. But that’s not all.

David Hyatt notes his work on Safari:

(5) A complete implementation of the XUL box model. Safari on Panther supports the complete XUL box model, including horizontal and vertical boxes, the ability to flex, and the ability to reorder content and reverse content. If you’re building canned content that you control using WebKit, you’ll find a whole new range of layout possibilities at your disposal. Need to create dynamically sized headers and footers and flexible center content? The XUL box model can do that. Need to center an object within the viewport? The XUL box model can do that too.

From October 28, 2003 @ 12:48 AM

Henrik Gemal also notes XUL support in Safari.

Ok, I found it interesting. Perhaps someone else will as well.

Camino Bookmarks

Interesting checkin for Camino. According to Pinkerton’s Post, it brings for some awesome features. In particular Rendezvous Integration makes my list. I’m real excited to see my favorite browser of all time making a stride forward. This is awesome “Top 10” bookmarks sounds interesting too (perhaps that could be ported to Firebird?)

Now where is Camino 1.0? I’m dying for it to get that far. It’s the best browser on the Mac. And in my opinion best browser on any platform.

Safari Madness

I’ve used it before, but today I gave Safari a real go. Despite the fact that some bugs exist, it does a pretty good job. My biggest complement goes to the UI. It’s clean, simple, and totally Apple. It shares the same DNA as Steve Jobs.

I also like the snapback and iSync functionality. Some nice little Apple features make web browsing pleasant. Rendering is pretty good, fast, clean, and pretty compatible.

Still though, I favor Camino. From the pages I tested (including my own) it loaded faster, and had the best rendering of the two browsers (both of which blow Internet Explorer away). The biggest incompatibilities I’ve noted are mainly with JavaScript not functioning properly (especially sites with large complex scripts) or some XHTML pages. All of which Camino and Mozilla do very well.

IMHO the winner is still Camino, and the entire Gecko line of browsers, although Safari gets an honorable mention. It’s UI features are clearly superior.

I don’t think many sites will cater to KHTML browsers though. I think it’s much more likely for them to test in Netscape or other Gecko browsers, than KHTML based browsers. As a result, Gecko based browsers will most likely always have an upper hand in compatibility, unless KHTML manages to really keep up, despite the never ending obstacles that lie in it’s way.

A side note: I’m need to check out OmniWeb (the WebCore version), and give that a go. I haven’t gotten to that yet.