Categories
Networking Politics

China Blocks RSS

China’s Great Firewall has now started blocking RSS, a long known loophole to get information blocked all other ways. An entire syndication standard is now blocked. According to the Ars Technica:

PSB appears to have extended this block to all incoming URLs that begin with “feeds,” “RSS,” and “blog,” thus rendering the RSS feeds from many sites—including ones that aren’t blocked in China, such as Ars Technica—useless.

I wonder if a good workaround would be to just use yourdomain.com/d0e862d00be15796f/ or some other randomness. It would be a better way around filtering of just the URL. Then the government would need to start sniffing content-type. The problem they would encounter there is that it’s far from standardized when it comes to feeds on the web. As a result they would have to either live with a high error rate. Unless of course the would resort to content sniffing, which has a ton of overhead when your talking about an entire countries internet bandwidth. That would be extremely expensive and either: slow down the internet in China, make it much more expensive, or just shut things down. My guess is a slowdown.

You can also just switch to atom until they catch on and block that too. The article mentions several other tricks including RSS aggregators, SSH tunnels, etc.

[Hat Tip: Slashdot]

Categories
Personal

The Silence

It’s a bit quiet around here for the past week because I sprained my wrist pretty bad. As a result I have been avoiding typing more than I already do at work. I am slowly resuming and getting back to normal as it allows. Been down this road before. Not as much fun as it sounds.

Categories
Mozilla Software

WGA No Longer An IE7 Requirement

According to Ars Technica, Microsoft may have removed the WGA requirement to install IE7 in hopes of gaining more market share by allowing users of pirated Windows XP systems to upgrade.

I doubt this will really do much. My guess is that those who are avoiding WGA are more technically advanced users. They either:

  • Use Firefox, since that’s what real cool kids do. Besides, they like the extensions.
  • Use Opera
  • Using a workaround to install without WGA.

I think the bigger reason IE6 is still so prominent is that corporations spent the better part of the decade bringing their applications on the web. Upgrading to IE7 means testing and upgrading them. Nobody wants to rush into that. Corporate users who will continue to use IE will mostly stick with IE6 until they move to Vista.