Firesheep Demonstrates The Need For SSL

There’s been a storm of discussion over the past 72 hours about Eric Butler’s Firefox extension Firesheep. To summarize, it’s a Firefox extension that facilitates session hijacking by packet sniffing for data from certain websites. As far as software goes, it’s more evolutionary than revolutionary, at its core it’s a packet sniffer. The evolution is the pretty UI which makes it trivial to hijack someone’s session (he really did do a good job on the UI, it’s so easy a child could use it).

It’s actually surprising to me that so many people are shocked by what this demonstrates. Even those who claim to be technically literate seem taken back. Insecure sites by definition are insecure. Anyone can read what’s going across the wire (that includes WiFi) when it is sent unencrypted. If your browser can interpret and use the information to let you browse Facebook, Twitter, etc. so can any browser, on any computer. It’s that simple. Firesheep only supports a handful of sites, but adding support for more sites isn’t difficult. If your favorite website hasn’t been done yet, I expect it will be soon enough.

How Do You Protect Yourself?

The best way to protect yourself is to demand that websites that hold private information use HTTPS from the moment you log in until you log out. Short of that, the best you can do is use a Firefox extension like EFF’s HTTPS Everywhere to force your browser to use HTTPS. This won’t work everywhere as not every web server even has HTTPS working, but many secretly do. They sometimes use HTTPS for certain things like login, then use insecure HTTP for the rest of your visit. That’s so your password isn’t transmitted in plain text. Protecting a password is important, but if the session is insecure anyone can intercept what you do. HTTPS Everywhere works by rewriting all requests to many popular sites to use HTTPS ensuring your privacy and security through the length of your visit. Some websites will have minor issues. For example Facebook Chat is impossible to support right now due to it not working via HTTPS. The rest of Facebook however works.

For more advanced users, HTTPS Everywhere lets you write your own rulesets for sites it doesn’t support.

How Do Websites Protect Their Users?

It’s very simple. Use HTTPS for the period a user is logged in, not just when authenticating and submitting sensitive data. Sure it’s a little slower and requires more hardware, but scaling HTTPS these days isn’t nearly as difficult as it was just 5 years ago. In 2 years it will be even easier. Google went as far as forcing HTTPS upon all of Gmail users. Binding a session to an IP address is fussy and largely ineffective due to NAT, WiFi hotspots and mobile services that can cause an IP to just change with little/no notice. It’s not effective security. It’s better than nothing, but it’s not a fix.

Google could make a huge difference by supporting SSL in Google AdSense, something I’ve called for since 2008. Google has supported SSL with Google Analytics for some time, but they have lagged with rolling out support in other services. Lots of websites monetize with AdSense and this is just another reason websites put off supporting SSL. Other ad networks should do the same. Google AdSense has the least barrier to entry since they serve their text ads off of their own infrastructure, vs. creatives hosted by other parties like some smaller ad networks. One could argue having third-party code inserted on a page mitigates security but it would still be a major improvement over the current state of affairs and would prevent simple session jacking.