Quick Thoughts On Dart

Google yesterday officially took the wraps off Dart. Google decided to stop short of outright calling it a replacement for JavaScript, however that does seem to be one of the goals.

I’m still looking at it myself, but my first impression is that the point of another language is buried in the details of the announcement. This particular sentence I think is the focal point (emphasis mine):

  • Ensure that Dart delivers high performance on all modern web browsers and environments ranging from small handheld devices to server-side execution.

I suspect the real goal behind Dart is to unify the stack as much as possible. Web Development today is one of the most convoluted things you can do in Computer Science. Think about just the technologies/languages you are going to deal with to create a “typical” application:

  • SQL
  • Server Side Language
  • HTML
  • CSS
  • JavaScript

That’s actually a very simple stack and almost academic in nature. “In real life” Most stacks are even more complicated, especially when dealing with big data. Most professions deal with a handful of technologies. Web Development deals with whatever is at hand. I’m not even getting into supporting multiple versions of multiple browsers on multiple OS’s.

Google even said in a leaked internal memo:

- Front-end Server — Dash will be designed as a language that can be used server-side for things up to the size of Google-scale Front Ends. This will allow large scale applications to unify on a single language for client and front end code.

Additionally:

What happened to Joy?
The Joy templating and MVC systems are higher-level frameworks that will be built on top of Dash.

By using one language you’d reduce what a developer needs to know and specialize in to build an application. This means higher productivity and more innovation and less knowledge overhead.

This wouldn’t be the first attempt at this either for Google. GWT is another Google effort to let developers write Java that’s transformed into JavaScript. This however doesn’t always work well and has limitations.

The web community has actually been working on this in the other direction via node.js which instead takes JS and puts it on the server side, rather than inventing a language that seems almost server side and wanting to put it in the browser.

Google still seems to have plans for Go:

What about Go?
Go is a very promising systems-programming language in the vein of C++. We fully hope and expect that Go becomes the standard back-end language at Google over the next few years. Dash is focused on client (and eventually Front-end server development). The needs there are different (flexibility vs. stability) and therefore a different programming language is warranted.

It seems like Go would be used where C++ or other high performance compiled languages are used today and Dart would be used for higher level front-end application servers as well as the client side, either directly or through a compiler which would turn it into JavaScript.

Would other browsers (Safari, Firefox, IE) consider adopting it? I’m unsure. Safari would likely have a lead as the memo states “Harmony will be implemented in V8 and JSC (Safari) simultaneously to avoid a WebKit compatibility gap”. Presumably IE and Firefox would be on their own to implement or adapt that work.

New languages rarely succeed in adoption. On the internet the barrier is even higher.

2 thoughts on “Quick Thoughts On Dart

  1. >New languages rarely succeed in adoption. On the internet the barrier is even higher.
    This is unfortunate. JavaScript is a piece of ****.

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